Goto main content

I feel that hope is dead in Syria

Nassrah, 56 years old, is from Deraa (soutern Syria). Her house was bombed at the start of the conflict. Her leg was injured by a missile and she had to be amputated. Fitted with a prosthesis by Handicap International, she is now learning to walk again with the organisation's help. 

Testimony_Nassrah

Nassrah, with her walking frame | © E. Fourt / Handicap International

Nassrah greets Mohamed, one of Handicap International's physiotherapists, who visits her regularly. She grips her walking frame to enter her caravan, invites him in and offers him some coffee. She removes her prosthesis to do her rehabilitation exercises and starts telling her story. "I lost my leg at the start of the revolution. I was at home with my children, when the tanks rolled in and started to bombard us. A missile came through the living room window and landed in my leg."

Shortly after the bombing, Nassrah took refuge in Jordan with some of her family members. "The rest of them are now scattered around the world. Some are in England, some have stayed in Syria. My only sister is still there." The tears start to fall as she continues, "When I speak to her on the phone, she tells me that life is really hard. She sobs down the line and tells me not to come back. I feel like hope is dead in Syria."

Nassrah dries her tears. In spite of the difficulties, she wants to continue to fight to get back on her feet.  She works hard during the physiotherapy sessions delivered by the organisation and tries to walk as much as possible. "If I can't go home I would like to go somewhere else because life in the camp is very difficult. But I would never leave without my sons. The family I have left is the most important thing in my life." The Syrian woman also has a passion for birds, she keeps a dozen of them in a small shelter, beside her caravan. "In my country, we love birds. Taking care of them is a way of feeling at home."

 

 

Date published: 01/06/17

COUNTRIES

Where we work

Read more

HI is ready to mobilise its teams in Gaza to support the most vulnerable
© Hardy Skills/HI (Archive)
Emergency

HI is ready to mobilise its teams in Gaza to support the most vulnerable

The resurgence of violence between Israelis and Palestinians since 11th May has already left dozens dead and many others injured, including at least nine children. Humanity & Inclusion (HI) teams in Gaza are ready to mobilise and provide aid to the most vulnerable people, including those who are injured.

Hardest hit: What the UK aid cuts mean for people with disabilities
© Kate Holt/HI
Emergency Inclusion

Hardest hit: What the UK aid cuts mean for people with disabilities

George Graham, Chief Executive of Humanity & Inclusion UK, responds to the deep cuts to UK aid and explains why they will hit people with disabilities the hardest.

FOLLOW US