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Inclusive Futures

The Inclusive Futures initiative works to ensure all children and adults with disabilities have the same likelihood as everyone else to access quality education, health and work opportunities.

Ali, who is blind, charges phones in the shop he owns with his wife Abiba, who is also blind, in Kakuma Town, Kenya.

© Kate Holt / HI

Inclusive Futures logo

There are one billion people living with disabilities in the world, and more than three quarters of them live in low- and middle-income countries.

Currently, many of them are not able to access quality education, health or work without facing stigma and discrimination.

Humanity & Inclusion (HI) is part of the Inclusive Futures initiative, led by Sightsavers and funded by UK Aid, which is working to ensure no one is left behind.

HI runs activities in Nepal and Kenya, as well as planning to start activities in Jordan (to be confirmed in 2021). In partnership with 15 partners, HI also manages Source, an international online resource centre on disability and inclusion where most of Inclusive Futures’ learning documents can be found.

 

How we’re working towards a more inclusive world

A girl in a classroom, Kenya Kakuma camp A girl in a classroom, Kenya Kakuma camp A girl in a classroom, Kenya Kakuma camp A girl in a classroom, Kenya Kakuma camp

Education

We are focusing on promoting access to quality basic education for children with disabilities.
 
The project in the Chitwan district of Nepal is identifying children between the ages of 3-13 both currently in education as well as those who have dropped out or never attended school.

We are tailoring activities and approaches to support an overall increase in the enrolment of children with disabilities in primary school education.

A Social Worker raising awareness in the community in Nepal A Social Worker raising awareness in the community in Nepal A Social Worker raising awareness in the community in Nepal A Social Worker raising awareness in the community in Nepal

Health

Health, barriers include limited access to information, negative attitudes from family and health workers, cost and physical barriers.

Young people with disabilities often have restricted access to sexual health and reproductive health services due to stigma and inaccessibility which limits their future prospects.
 
The project is working with health service providers, training health workers to identify and provide quality sexual and reproductive health services to people with disabilities.

A wheelchair user working in the reception at the NNSWA rehabilitation centre. A wheelchair user working in the reception at the NNSWA rehabilitation centre. A wheelchair user working in the reception at the NNSWA rehabilitation centre. A wheelchair user working in the reception at the NNSWA rehabilitation centre.

Work

When people with disabilities have access to skills training and paid work, and are economically empowered, it not only benefits them, but also their families and wider society, both economically and culturally.

A blind woman walking with a child, Kakuma Camp, Kenya A blind woman walking with a child, Kakuma Camp, Kenya A blind woman walking with a child, Kakuma Camp, Kenya A blind woman walking with a child, Kakuma Camp, Kenya

Stigma and discrimination

The consortium is gathering evidence and research on discrimination to support governments to increase action towards social inclusion. By bringing together people from all parts of society and providing a platform to challenge assumptions and propose solutions to problems that affect their lives.

What does the programme aim to achieve?

  • To generate robust evidence (which will be open access and available on Source) of what works to enable people with disabilities to access employment, education and health.
  • To develop partnerships between private, public and civil society to influence the inclusion of people with disabilities.
  • To offer training initiatives and internships to improve the skills of up to 2,000 people with disabilities, emphasising skills relevant to formal employment.
  • To help disability movements in each country to develop their own knowledge and resources, so they can continue the advocate for and support people with disabilities.
  • To increase international action and investment in disability inclusion.

Project partners

The Inclusive Futures initiative is led by Sightsavers, with the following partners:

  • ADD International
  • BBC Media Action
  • Benetech
  • BRAC
  • Development Initiatives
  • Humanity & Inclusion
  • Inclusion International
  • Institute of Development Studies
  • International Disability Alliance
  • Leonard Cheshire
  • Light for the World
  • Sense International
  • Social Development Direct
  • Standard Chartered
  • Youth Career Initiative

For more information on Inclusive Futures visit: inclusivefutures.org


UKAid logoInclusive Futures is funded through UK aid. It demonstrates the UK government’s commitment to global leadership on inclusive development by ensuring people with disabilities are central to international development policy-making and programmes.