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Morocco

Handicap International shares its expertise with disabled people’s organisations in Morocco. Together, we run projects to promote the inclusion of adults and children with disabilities in society. 

A girl writing on a blackboard, Morocco - Handicap International

© A. Vincens de Tapol / Handicap International

Our actions

In Morocco, Handicap International works for a better inclusion of people with disabilities within the society. In the regions of Casablanca, Tangiers-Titouan, Rabat-Sale-Kenitra and Souss-Massa, the organisation leads several projects to improve the school enrolment of children with disabilities with the help of the education authorities.

In order to improve the medical and social care of people with disabilities, Handicap International currently implements a pilot project with 5 facilities. The organisation also supports the upgrading of the national occupational therapy curriculum with the local Ministry of Health.

Finally, Handicap International supports Morocco’s community network to ensure that people with disabilities can participate in the electoral and legislative process.

Areas of intervention

Latest stories

African States against the use of explosive weapons in populated areas
© HI
Explosive weapons

African States against the use of explosive weapons in populated areas

From 27th to 28th November, Handicap International (HI) is organising a regional conference on the bombing of civilians. The Conference will take place in Maputo, Mozambique and aims to bring together some 20 States, 10 African civil society organisations and international NGOs. The goal is to raise awareness of this vital challenge among African countries and to encourage them to take action on the world stage to protect civilians from the devastating impact of the use of explosive weapons in populated areas.

Background

In this country which is moving towards democracy, disabled people’ s organisations are mobilising to make their voices heard.

During the Arab Spring in 2011, the constitutional monarchy found itself up against the February 20th Movement. This movement succeeded in bringing about reform of the constitution, which now formally provides for non-discrimination on the basis of disability.

However, policies to improve the social participation of people with disabilities are still applied very sketchily, mainly due to a lack of funding. Disabled people have very few dedicated services (care assistants, building access etc.) and their participation in civil society remains limited.

However, disabled people’s organisations are gearing up to push through rapid change and ensure that people with disabilities are fully taken into account within the national reform process.

However, disabled people’s organisations are gearing up to push through rapid change and ensure that people with disabilities are fully taken into account within the national reform process.

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