Go to main content

30,000 people killed or injured by explosive weapons in 2019

Explosive weapons
International United Kingdom

HI partner organisation Action On Armed Violence (AOAV) releases figures on explosive violence casualties in 2019.

City of Kobané in North Syria after heavy bombing in 2016

City of Kobané in North Syria after heavy bombing in 2016 | © P. Houliat / HI

Action on Armed Violence (AOAV) has recorded 29,500 deaths and injuries from the use of explosive weapons around the world in 2019. Civilians continued to bear the burden of harm, accounting for 66% (or 19,400) of total casualties (killed and injured).

When explosive weapons were used in populated areas, over 90% of those killed and injured were civilians. 17,900 civilian casualties were recorded in populated areas, whereas 1,500 civilian casualties were killed in injured in areas not reported as populated.

 

Some countries saw sharp rises of civilian casualties: Afghanistan saw a 9% rise in civilian harm; Somalia saw a 14% rise; and Libya saw a 131% rise.

In total, manufactured weapons caused 51% of global civilian harm from explosive weapons, while improvised explosive devices (IEDs) caused 49%.

 

“In many conflicts, bombing and shelling put an unbearable threat to civilians and forcing the population to flee. They also leave heavy contamination by explosive remnants posing and long lasting threat for civilians after a battle. Bombing in urban areas is a disaster for the protection of civilians in conflict. Political discussions between States have begun in order to draft an international political declaration against the use of explosive weapons in populated areas. Several states appear opposed to a strong political commitment. It is unacceptable. HI is totally involved in this diplomatic process aiming at improving the protection of civilians in armed conflict and fights for a strong political declaration to be adopted next May. For this, we need the back-up of the public to put pressure on governments and to ensure they are fully committed against bombing in populated areas.”

HI advocacy Director Anne Héry

 

If you are ever going to act to ensure your Government acts to Stop Bombing Civilians, now is the time. Email your MP to help put pressure on the UK government. You will be helping to save lives.

Where we work

Read more

Blog: Now is the time to show every single person with disabilities that they matter
© Quinn Neely/HI
Emergency Health Prevention

Blog: Now is the time to show every single person with disabilities that they matter

People with disabilities are disproportionately impacted by COVID-19. Aleema Shivji, Executive Director of Humanity & Inclusion UK, calls on the signatories of the Humanitarian Disability Charter, including the UK government, to make good on their commitments to include people with disabilities in humanitarian response to the pandemic.

Blog: COVID-19 - We must leave no one behind
Photo by Markus Spiske on Unsplash
Emergency Health

Blog: COVID-19 - We must leave no one behind

Aleema Shivji, Executive Director of Humanity & Inclusion UK, explains the impact of COVID-19 on the most vulnerable people living in developing countries.

HI adapts its actions to combat Covid-19 and protect the most vulnerable
© Quinn Neely / HI
Emergency Health Inclusion

HI adapts its actions to combat Covid-19 and protect the most vulnerable

Humanity & Inclusion teams are making changes to the way they work in order to slow the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic wherever possible. This includes reviewing their current actions and implementing new projects. The aim is to protect people from the virus and deal with the impact of the crisis, with a focus on people with disabilities, children, women, and isolated and older people.