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Diabetic Abdel gets his strength back after amputation

Inclusion Rehabilitation
Jordan

After losing his foot to diabetes, Abdel is slowly recovering his strength thanks to support from Humanity & Inclusion's teams.

Abdelrazzaq gains his mobility back thanks to HI physiothrapists

© HI

Abdelrazzaq has diabetes. He began gradually feeling pain in one of his right toe. Doctors decided to amputate it. Unfortunately, the disease quickly spread to the whole foot. HI supported him during recovery and allowed him to walk again, using a prosthesis.

After the doctor advised him to amputate his lower right leg, he made up his mind and went for the surgery at the local hospital.

Impact on his private life

Due to his health issues, his wife went away and left him with his sons, which puts him in a difficult financial situation.

The 55-year old Syrian refugee currently lives in a house with his sons close to the Baqaa refugees camp. He used to be a truck driver.

"I have been diabetic for many years and I tried to overcome the disease. But I have lately felt helpless, dependable and weak due to amputation."

The rehabilitation process

Abdelrazzaq suffers from muscle weakness in his right hip and knee joints. He has a limitation in the knee extending range of motion. On his amputated side, his stump has an irregular shape. 

At the rehabilitation centre, the local medical team supported by HI gave Abdelrazzaq physiotherapy sessions to increase muscles strength and flexibility and banding to improve stump shape. Then, Abdelrazzaq received his prosthesis with training sessions on how to use it, to stand up and walk.

"I have stopped using the wheelchair and I am now able to get out of my house and meet people",

he reports. He is very happy to be able to walk again.

In addition, Abdelrazzaq is a friendly person who does not like to feel secluded and lonely. Today, he has gained his mobility back and he is able to carry on his daily activities.

HI's response to the Syrian Crisis

HI and its local partners have been assisting Syrian refugees and vulnerable people in Jordan and in Lebanon since 2012.

In 2019, we had an amazing impact:

Jordan

  • HI and its partners provided rehabilitation sessions to 3,215 people.
  • HI supplied 382 people with mobility equipment such as wheelchairs, canes, and crutches.
  • HI supported more than 400 people with psychological and social aid.
  • HI worked with 11 local partners.

Lebanon

  • HI and its partners provided rehabilitation sessions to more than 3,000 people and supplied around 500 people with mobility equipment such as wheelchairs, canes, and crutches.
  • HI supported around 220 people with psychological support.
  • HI conducted 2,000 Risk Education sessions on the dangers of unexploded weapons, which reached more than 40,000 people.
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