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Syria crisis: Our biggest expense is medicine

Inclusion Rehabilitation
Jordan

At the start of the war in Syria, Hussein and his family left their home town to take refuge in Jordan. In the last few years, he has suffered from a series of medical complications. Thanks to HI's partnership with a local rehabilitation centre, the arthritis he suffers from in his knee is now managed by a team of physiotherapists.

Hussein sitting on the floor of his home

© O. Van de Broeck / HI

Hussein, 72 years old, is sat in his living room with his wife. He mostly stays at home nowadays. The arthritis in his knee impedes his movements and leaving the house is a painful experience. 

As Hussein explains, "In Jordan, there are lots of slopes and steps in the towns which make it difficult for me to get about."

Constant pain

Hussein has been affected by this degenerative condition for the last three years: the cartilage in his knee is gradually wearing away making it painful for him to use his legs.  He has had to adapt his day-to-day activities.

"Since the onset of my arthritis, there are lots of things I can no longer do. I have to sit on a chair to pray (Muslim prayer usually requires kneeling on the floor), I cannot walk very far, and it is difficult for me to do the shopping as I struggle to lift things."

The couple are entirely dependent on their son who helps them in their day-to-day tasks and provides them with the care they need. 

"My wife cannot take care of me because she is in even worse health. She can no longer stand, and she has also had a heart operation," adds Hussein.

Helping to cover medical expenses

The family are unable to meet the cost of their medical care.

"Money is our biggest problem. We no longer own our own house. We pay rent for this one and the medical expenses soon mount up. Up until now we had to pay for all our medical treatments. My grandson also has eczema and asthma and his treatment alone is very expensive," says Hussein.

The burden of their medical care has been alleviated by Humanity & Inclusion. The organisation covers physiotherapy sessions at a rehabilitation centre in a partner hospital and the transport to and from the sessions.

Hussein's condition has improved thanks to the physiotherapy and he finds it easier to walk.

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