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Yemen: An urgent need to provide care for the injured

Emergency Rehabilitation

For one year now Yemen has been torn apart by a conflict that has killed over 3,000 civilians. The humanitarian needs are immense. Since October 2015, Handicap International has been providing care for the injured. Over 1,200 people have already been helped by the organisation.

Saeed, a Handicap International physiotherapist, with a patient at the Al-Thawra hospital in Sanaa, one of the main hospitals providing care for victims of the conflict.

© Handicap International

Handicap International is working in two hospitals and one health centre in Sanaa, the capital of Yemen, where patients from throughout the north and west of the country are treated.

The organisation provides assistance in managing the physical and psychological trauma patients have suffered. The first aid they receive is absolutely vital to ensuring patients make as full a recovery as possible in terms of their physical capacities. Handicap International has therefore trained 100 health care staff working in Sanaa and other governorates in treating traumatic injuries inflicted through conflict.

The organisation has also distributed 1,800 mobility aids, including crutches and wheelchairs, which help people with injuries to recover their independence more quickly. However, it is important not to forget about the invisible suffering that also results from this violence: over 1,000 people, both victims of the conflict and their close family and friends, have received psychological support from the organisation.

At the same time, Handicap International is sharing information and advice with other humanitarian organisations working in the country to ensure proper provision is made for vulnerable people - people with disabilities, women, children etc. - in their emergency response efforts, such as water or food distributions.

Over the last few weeks, our teams have been carrying out identification work in the geographical areas worst affected by landmines and explosive remnants of war. This work will ultimately be used to inform the local populations of the risk of accidents due to explosive remnants of war.

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